OUR MEDIATION SERVICES

What is Mediation

Mediation offers an informal way of settling your dispute without going to court. It involves a process whereby disputing parties identify and explore their issue/s; develop proposals or possible solutions, reality test proposed solutions and make a genuine effort to reach agreement. Attendance is usually voluntary - except for Family Law matters that require parties to attend Family Dispute Resolution (mediation) before applying to have a child matter dealt with in court.

Mediation offers a way of settling your dispute without going to court. Attendance is usually voluntary - except for Family Law matters that require parties to attend Family Dispute Resolution before applying to have a child matter dealt with in court.

Agreeing to mediate will save you time and money however, both parties must agree to participate before the process can begin.  Participation can be face-to-face, via telephone or Skype.

There is an expectation that you will interact respectfully with the other party and make a genuine effort to resolve your dispute. Each party will be asked to bring proposals (or suggested solutions) to the table and explain how they might work. If you say ‘No’ to the other party’s proposal you will be asked to table an alternative solution. The goal is to agree on a solution that both parties can live with. 

At Northern Frontiers an experienced mediator will assess whether your dispute is suitable for mediation before seeking permission to contact the party and invite them to the process. For this to happen you will be required to provide contact details of the other party. Mediation sessions are scheduled in two-hour blocks at a time that is convenient for both parties.

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Advantages of Mediation

Mediation saves you time and money and is usually less stressful than litigation.  It offers disputant parties a way of working together to resolve their dispute as opposed to being pitted against one another in a court environment. In this way relationships may be strengthened and protected from further harm.  Participation can be in person, via telephone or Skype – which means there is no need to disrupt your work/life schedule if you live remote or simply prefer to mediate from the comfort of a preferred location.

Role of Participants

There is an expectation that you will interact respectfully with the other party and make a genuine effort to resolve your dispute. Each party will be asked to identify the issue/s in dispute, make proposals (or suggested solutions) and explain how they might work. If you say ‘No’ to a proposal you will be asked to table an alternative. Mediation is all about working together to find the middle ground and develop solutions that both parties can live with. Making demands or trying to convince the other party that your way is the only way is unlikely to achieve resolution.

Role of the Mediator

At Northern Frontiers an experienced mediator will assess whether your dispute is suitable for mediation before seeking permission to contact the party and invite them to the process. For this to happen you will be required to provide contact details of the other party.

As the neutral third party, mediators are primarily responsible for managing the mediation process and facilitating conversation and problem-solving between disputing parties. A mediator can offer examples of how similar disputes have been resolved but they cannot make decisions for you or decide who is right and who is wrong. If agreement is reached the mediator will document your agreement and forward a copy to each party. Parties are strongly advised to seek legal advice before, during and after mediation.

Mediation sessions at Northern Frontiers are scheduled in minimum two-hour blocks at a time that is convenient for both parties.  Longer sessions can be arranged via discussion with the Mediator.

Mediators are primarily responsible for managing the mediation process. They can provide general examples of how similar disputes were resolved but they cannot make decisions for you or decide who is right and who is wrong. If agreement is reached your mediator will, at your request, document the agreement and forward a copy to each party. You are strongly advised to seek legal advice before, during and after mediation.

Types of matters that might typically be mediated

Most non-criminal matters can be assessed as suitable for mediation. These might include a dispute with a neighbour over the positioning of security lights - or disagreement about intrusive vegetation. Disputes between family members or business partners, tenants and landlords or work colleagues may also be suitable for mediation. 

Disputes involving separated families and childcare arrangements are suitable for mediation. At Northern Frontiers a fully qualified Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner (or Mediator) is available to assist separated families develop Parenting Plans and/or Property Agreements or issue S60I certificates where appropriate.

 If you are unsure about the suitability of your dispute for mediation, please consult our friendly reception staff.   

Out of Hours Appointments: In addition to normal business hours 7.30am - 5.00pm weekdays, we offer weekend appointments on availability - which means there's no need to disrupt your work schedule. Out of hours appointments tend to fill fast so please book early to avoid disappointment. Simply call 1300 90 81 70 or email: reception@northernfrontiers.com.au